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Texas Laws | Natural Resources Code
NATURAL RESOURCES CODE
TITLE 9. HERITAGE

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2688, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14691)

Sec. 191.132. DAMAGE OR DESTRUCTION. (14692)(Text)

(a) No person may intentionally and knowingly deface American Indian or aboriginal paintings, hieroglyphics, or other marks or carvings on rock or elsewhere that pertain to early American Indian or aboriginal habitation of the country. (14693)

(b) A person who is not the owner shall not wilfully injure, disfigure, remove, or destroy a historical structure, monument, marker, medallion, or artifact without lawful authority. (14694)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2688, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14695)

Sec. 191.133. ENTRY WITHOUT CONSENT. (14696)(Text)

No person who is not the owner, and does not have the consent of the owner, proprietor, lessee, or person in charge, may enter or attempt to enter on the enclosed land of another and intentionally injure, disfigure, remove, excavate, damage, take, dig into, or destroy any historical structure, monument, marker, medallion, or artifact, or any prehistoric or historic archeological site, American Indian or aboriginal campsite, artifact, burial, ruin, or other archeological remains located in, on, or under any private land within the State of Texas. (14697)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2688, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14698)

Sec. 191.171. CRIMINAL PENALTY. (14699)(Text)

(a) A person violating any of the provisions of this chapter is guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be punished by a fine of not less than $50 and not more than $1,000, by confinement in jail for not more than 30 days, or by both. (14700)

(b) Each day of continued violation of any provision of this chapter constitutes a separate offense for which the offender may be punished. (14701)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2689, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14702)

Sec. 191.172. CIVIL ACTION BY ATTORNEY GENERAL. (14703)(Text)

(a) In addition to, and without limiting the other powers of the attorney general, and without altering or waiving any criminal penalty provided in this chapter, the attorney general may bring an action in the name of the State of Texas in any court of competent jurisdiction for restraining orders and injunctive relief to restrain and enjoin violations or threatened violations of this chapter, and for the return of items taken in violation of the provisions of this chapter. (14704)

(b) Venue for an action instituted by the attorney general lies either in Travis County or in the county in which the activity sought to be restrained is alleged to be taking place or from which the items were taken. (14705)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2689, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14706)

Sec. 191.173. CIVIL ACTION BY CITIZEN. (14707)(Text)

(a) A citizen of the State of Texas may bring an action in any court of competent jurisdiction for restraining orders and injunctive relief to restrain and enjoin violations or threatened violations of this chapter, and for the return of items taken in violation of the provisions of this chapter. (14708)

(b) Venue of an action by a citizen lies in the county in which the activity sought to be restrained is alleged to be taking place or from which the items were taken. (14709)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2689, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. (14710)

Sec. 191.174. ASSISTANCE FROM STATE AGENCIES, POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS, AND LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS. (14711)(Text)

(a) The chief administrative officers of all state agencies and political subdivisions are directed to cooperate and assist the committee and the attorney general in carrying out the intent of this chapter. (14712)

(b) All state and local law enforcement agencies and officers are directed to assist in enforcing the provisions and carrying out the intent of this chapter. (14713)

Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 2689, ch. 871, art. I, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1977. Amended by Acts 1987, 70th Leg., ch. 948, Sec. 15, eff. Sept. 1, 1987. (14714)

TITLE 10. CAVES (14715)(Text)

CHAPTER 201. CAVERN PROTECTION (14716)(Text)

Sec. 201.001. POLICY. (14717)(Text)

It is declared to be the public policy and in the public interest of the State of Texas to protect and preserve all caves on or under any of the land in the State of Texas, including tidelands, submerged land, and the bed of the sea within the jurisdiction of the State of Texas. (14718)

Added by Acts 1979, 66th Leg., p. 2003, ch. 785, Sec. 5, eff. June 13, 1979. (14719)

Sec. 201.002. DEFINITIONS. (14720)(Text)

In this chapter: (14721)

(1) "Cave" means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and includes or is synonymous with cavern, pit, pothole, well, sinkhole, and grotto. (14722)

(2) "Gate" means any structure, lock, door, or device located to limit or prohibit access or entry to any cave. (14723)

(3) "Speleothem" means a natural mineral formation or deposit occurring in a cave, and includes or is synonymous with stalagmites, stalactites, helictites, anthodites, gypsum flowers, needles, angel's hair, soda straws, draperies, bacon, cave pearls, popcorn (coral), rimstone dams, columns, plettes, flowstone, or other similar crystalline mineral formations commonly composed of calcite, epsomite, gypsum, aragonite, celestite, and other similar minerals and formations. (14724)

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