Goto previous pageGoto next page
pg. 14

California Laws | Harbors and Navigation Code
DIVISION 1. DEPARTMENT OF BOATING AND WATERWAYS AND THE BOATING AND WATERWAYS COMMISSION
CHAPTER 4. HARBORS AND WATERCRAFT REVOLVING FUND (85-88)

(2) The small craft harbor or boating facility shall be designed, constructed, developed, improved, and operated to meet, at a minimum, applicable certification standards described in the Tier 1 standards of the California Green Building Standards Code (Part 11 of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations). (299)

(d) During the term of any existing or new loan contract made pursuant to Section 71.4 or 76.3, or any existing or new contract or agreement pursuant to Section 70, 70.2, or 70.8, the department shall supervise and monitor compliance with this section and the operation and maintenance of the harbor or facility to assure that the planning, construction, development, or improvement fully complies with this section and the contract or agreement terms and conditions. (300)

(e) For the purposes of this chapter and Article 3 (commencing with Section 70) of Chapter 2, a harbor or facility that is the subject of a contract or agreement as described in subdivision (d), is under the jurisdiction of the department. (301)

87. The department shall give consideration for funding the planning, construction, development, or improvement of small craft harbors to projects which are financially feasible and which make existing small craft harbors, which are subject to the jurisdiction of the department, substantially meet the provisions of Section 86. (302)

88. A small craft harbor or boating facility funded pursuant to Section 70, 70.2, 70.8, 71.4, 72.5, or 76.3 is not liable for any damages which occur on a vessel using those facilities or pursuant to operation of the vessel, other than on the facilities of the harbor or boating facility. This section does not provide immunity from liability for a small craft harbor or boating facility for its negligent acts. (303)

DIVISION 1.5. NAVIGABLE WATERS (304)(Text)

CHAPTER 1. SCOPE OF DIVISION (90) (305)(Text)

90. The provisions of this Division, in so far as they are not in conflict with the admiralty and maritime jursidiction and laws of the United States, apply to navigable waters of the United States. (306)

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITION AND DESCRIPTION (100-107) (307)(Text)

100. Navigable waters and all streams of sufficient capacity to transport the products of the country are public ways for the purposes of navigation and of such transportation. However, the floodwaters of any navigable river, stream, slough, or other watercourse while temporarily flowing above the normal high-water mark over public or private lands outside any established banks of such river, stream, slough, or other watercourse are not navigable waters and nothing in this section shall be construed as permitting trespass on any such lands. For the purposes of this section, "floodwaters" refers to that elevation of water which occurs at extraordinary times of flood and does not mean the water elevation of ordinary annual or recurring high waters resulting from normal runoff. (308)

101. The following streams and waters are declared navigable and are public ways: (309)

Albion River, to a point three miles from its mouth. (310)

Alviso Slough, sometimes called Steamboat Slough, lying between the bay of San Francisco and the place where it was crossed by the tracks of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company on June 10, 1913. (311)

Big River, to a point three miles from its mouth. (312)

Channel Street, in the city of San Francisco, from the bay to the northeasterly line of Seventh Street, the width thereof to be one hundred forty feet. (313)

Clear Lake, in Lake County; but this declaration shall not interfere with any rights of owners and claimants to reclaim swamp or overflowed land around the margin of Clear Lake. (314)

Corte Madera Creek, in Marin County, from its mouth to a point as far as tidewater flows. (315)

Coyote River between the bay of San Francisco and the place where it was crossed by the tracks of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company on June 10, 1913. (316)

102. The following streams and waters are also navigable and are public ways: (317)

Deer Creek, between its mouth and the house of Peter Lassen. (318)

Devil's Slough, lying within the corporate limits of the city of San Jose, or of the town of Sunnyvale in Santa Clara County, and extending to San Francisco Bay. (319)

Diablo Creek, from its junction with the Neuces, to a point opposite the warehouse of Frank Such, in Contra Costa County. (320)

Feather River, between its mouth and a point fifty feet below the first bridge crossing Feather River above the mouth of the Yuba River. (321)

Galinas, or Guyanas Slough or creek, in Marin County, from its mouth to the line of the Sonoma and Marin Railroad as it existed on March 18, 1907. (322)

Guadalupe Slough, which is the outlet or mouth of the Guadalupe River, and lies between San Francisco Bay and its junction with Alviso Slough. (323)

103. The following streams and waters are also navigable and are public ways: (324)

Johnson's Creek, from its mouth at San Francisco Bay to Simpson's Landing. (325)

Keys Creek, also known as the Arroyo de San Antonio, in Marin County, from its mouth at Tomales Bay to the warehouses on the point at Keys embarcadero. (326)

Klamath River, from its mouth in Del Norte County to its confluence with the Shasta River in the county of Siskiyou; but this shall not abrogate or infringe upon mining rights or the rights of locating or operating mining claims on the Klamath River, existing on August 21, 1933, otherwise than by being made subject to the public rights of way herein declared. (327)

Arroyo del Medo, in the county of Santa Clara, from its mouth to the upper line of the town of New Haven. (328)

Mission Creek, in the county of San Francisco. (329)

Mokelumne River, between its mouth and the first falls. (330)

Moro Cojo Slough, in Monterey County, from Salinas River to tidewater. (331)

104. The following streams and waters are also navigable and are public ways: (332)

Napa River, between its mouth and a point sixty feet below the westerly line of Lawrence Street in the city of Napa; First Napa Creek, Second Napa Creek, and Third Napa Creek, in Sonoma County, between Napa and Sonoma rivers. (333)

Goto previous page14Goto next page

  

Our Mission
Objective

Our mission is to provide citizens free access to the laws and codes of their state utilizing a unique search engine that matches clients with qualified legal professionals who can help with specific issues.

Our goal is to do this in a manner that promotes open government and freedom of information, while providing attorneys with valuable tools to connect with qualified prospects in need of professional services.

Ignorance Is No Excuse
Your Right To Know The Law

All citizens have a right to have access to the laws that govern them. Citizen awareness and participation in government is fundamental to ensuring a sound democracy.

Although unfettered access to the law is a fundamental right to all citizens, there is no substitute for experienced legal counsel.

We do not recommend self-representation. We do, however, recognize that in an age where people routinely research legal matters online using everything from a smartphone to their xbox, both attorneys and clients alike can benefit from this resource.