Goto previous pageGoto next page
pg. 16

Connecticut Laws | Title 26 Fisheries And Game
CHAPTER 490 FISHERIES AND GAME
Sec. 26-42. Licensing of raw fur dealers. Inspection. Regulations.

(b) The commissioner may adopt regulations in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54 concerning the buying and selling of raw furs. Such regulations may establish (1) procedures for recording and reporting transactions involving raw furs, and (2) tagging requirements for buying and selling raw furs. (267)

(c) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars or more than two hundred fifty dollars or imprisoned not more than ten days or be both fined and imprisoned. (268)

Sec. 26-43. Sale of raw furs to unlicensed nonresident dealer. (269)(Text)

Any licensed resident fur dealer or any other person who sells raw furs to any unlicensed nonresident fur dealer while within the boundaries of this state or who aids such unlicensed nonresident dealer, while within the boundaries of this state, in buying raw furs shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than two hundred and fifty dollars or be imprisoned not more than ten days or be both fined and imprisoned, and such licensed resident fur dealer shall forfeit his fur dealer's license for one year from the date of his conviction. (270)

Sec. 26-44. Licensing of ferrets. (271)(Text)

Section 26-44 is repealed. (272)

Sec. 26-45. Bait dealer's license. (273)(Text)

No person shall possess for the purpose of sale, sell or offer for sale any bait species without first obtaining a bait dealer's license from the commissioner, provided the provisions hereof shall not apply to persons issued a commercial hatchery license under section 26-149. Application forms for such license shall be furnished by the commissioner. Such license shall be nontransferable. The fee for each such license shall be sixty-three dollars annually. Each such license shall expire on the last day of December next after issuance. Each such licensed bait dealer may possess and sell only such bait species as shall be authorized under regulations issued by the commissioner, provided live carp and goldfish shall not be possessed for any purpose on premises used by licensed bait dealers. Each such licensee shall keep such records relating to the operation of such business as the commissioner determines on forms furnished by the commissioner and shall file such report with the commissioner within thirty days after the expiration of such license. No such report shall contain any material false statement. Failure to file such report shall be a violation of this section and the commissioner may refuse to reissue such license until the licensee complies with this requirement. Representatives of the commissioner may enter upon the premises of bait dealers at any time to inspect required records and the bait species possessed and to detect violations of this section and regulations issued hereunder by the commissioner, and such representatives may confiscate and dispose of any fish illegally possessed. Any person who violates any provision of this section or any such regulation issued by the commissioner shall be fined not less than ten dollars nor more than one hundred dollars or be imprisoned not more than thirty days, or both. (274)

Sec. 26-46. Reciprocal fishing privileges. (275)(Text)

(a) If and when the state of New York, the state of Massachusetts or the state of Rhode Island enacts a similar law granting reciprocal privileges to residents of this state, any person who holds a license to fish in inland waters in the state of New York, the state of Massachusetts or the state of Rhode Island may fish in inland waters lying partly in this state and partly in such adjoining state, or in such waters as negotiated by the Commissioner of Environmental Protection of this state and any similar authority in such adjoining state, without a nonresident inland waters license to fish as required by this chapter, provided such nonresidents shall be subject to all other provisions of the statutes and the regulations of the commissioner relating to fishing in lakes and ponds. (276)

(b) If and when the state of New York, the state of Massachusetts, the state of New Hampshire, the state of Maine or the state of Rhode Island enacts a similar law granting reciprocal privileges to residents of this state, any nonresident who holds a marine waters fishing license issued by one of said states having such reciprocal privileges may fish in the marine district or land marine species in Connecticut and shall not be required to purchase a Connecticut nonresident marine waters fishing license. Such nonresidents shall be subject to all other provisions of the statutes and the regulations of the commissioner relating to fishing in the marine district. (277)

Sec. 26-47. Permits to take wildlife damaging crops. License to control nuisance wildlife. (278)(Text)

(a) When it is shown to the satisfaction of the commissioner that wildlife is causing unreasonable damage to agricultural crops during the night and it is found by the commissioner that control of such damage by wildlife is impracticable during the daylight hours, the commissioner may issue permits for the taking of such wildlife as the commissioner deems necessary to control such damage by such method as the commissioner determines, including the use of lights, during the period between sunset and sunrise, upon written application of the owner or lessee of record of the land on which such crops are grown. Such permits may be issued to any qualified person designated by such landowner or lessee. The person to whom such permit is issued shall be held responsible for complying with the conditions under which such permit is issued. The provisions of this section shall not apply to deer. (279)

(b) (1) No person shall engage in the business of controlling nuisance wildlife, other than rats or mice, without obtaining a license from the commissioner. Such license shall be valid for a period of two years and may be renewed in accordance with a schedule established by the commissioner. The fee for such license shall be two hundred fifty dollars. The controlling of nuisance wildlife at the direction of the commissioner shall not constitute engaging in the business of controlling nuisance wildlife for the purposes of this section. No person shall be licensed under this subsection unless the person: (A) Provides evidence, satisfactory to the commissioner, that the person has completed training which included instruction in site evaluation, methods of nonlethal and approved lethal resolution of common nuisance wildlife problems, techniques to prevent reoccurrence of such problems and humane capture, handling and euthanasia of nuisance wildlife and instruction in methods of nonlethal resolution of common nuisance wildlife problems, including, but not limited to, training regarding frightening devices, repellants, one-way door exclusion and other exclusion methods, habitat modification and live-trapping and releasing and other methods as the commissioner may deem appropriate; and (B) is a resident of this state or of a state that does not prohibit residents of this state from being licensed as nuisance wildlife control operators because of lack of residency. (280)

Goto previous page16Goto next page

  

Our Mission
Objective

Our mission is to provide citizens free access to the laws and codes of their state utilizing a unique search engine that matches clients with qualified legal professionals who can help with specific issues.

Our goal is to do this in a manner that promotes open government and freedom of information, while providing attorneys with valuable tools to connect with qualified prospects in need of professional services.

Ignorance Is No Excuse
Your Right To Know The Law

All citizens have a right to have access to the laws that govern them. Citizen awareness and participation in government is fundamental to ensuring a sound democracy.

Although unfettered access to the law is a fundamental right to all citizens, there is no substitute for experienced legal counsel.

We do not recommend self-representation. We do, however, recognize that in an age where people routinely research legal matters online using everything from a smartphone to their xbox, both attorneys and clients alike can benefit from this resource.