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Connecticut Laws | Title 26 Fisheries And Game
CHAPTER 490 FISHERIES AND GAME
Sec. 26-6c. Immunity from attachments.

Sec. 26-6c. Immunity from attachments. (58)(Text)

No attachments shall be made against the real or personal property of any conservation officer, special conservation officer or patrolman for any actions taken in the performance of his duties. (59)

Sec. 26-7. Volunteer assistants. (60)(Text)

The Commissioner of Environmental Protection may appoint suitable citizens in each community to assist as volunteers, without compensation, in any fish and game program of the department with the same authority as regular members of the department, except the power of enforcement or arrest. (61)

Sec. 26-8. Ordinances controlling use of waters not applicable to department or employees. (62)(Text)

No municipal ordinance, the purpose of which is to control the use of boats and motors on, or other public use of, any lake or pond, shall apply to boats and motors owned by the department or be enforceable against any employee of the department while he is engaged in the enforcement of laws and regulations and the performance of other official duties. (63)

Sec. 26-9. Annual exhibition. (64)(Text)

The commissioner, in conjunction with and by assistance from other state departments, is authorized to promote and direct an annual Connecticut exhibition for the purpose of disseminating information regarding the activities and achievements of the various state departments, particularly those connected with the conservation or restoration of forests and wildlife, and the opportunities for other forms of outdoor recreation in the state. The expense of conducting such exhibition shall be paid from admission charges. No expense shall be imposed upon the state by reason of such exhibition, except that departments may use from their appropriations such funds as may be necessary for preparing and placing exhibits at any such exhibitions. Any profits derived from any such exhibition shall be paid to the State Treasurer. (65)

Secs. 26-10 to 26-13. Board may borrow from General Fund. Game Fund. Fish Fund. Disposition of receipts. (66)(Text)

Sections 26-10 to 26-13, inclusive, are repealed. (67)

Sec. 26-14. Federal aid for fish restoration projects. (68)(Text)

Section 26-14 is repealed, effective April 14, 2010. (69)

Sec. 26-15. Fish and wildlife restoration projects. Funds for programs and functions of Bureau of Natural Resources. (70)(Text)

The state of Connecticut assents to the provisions of the Act of Congress titled "Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act", approved September 2, 1937, and the provisions of the Act of Congress titled "Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act", approved August 9, 1950. The Commissioner of Environmental Protection is authorized and directed to perform such acts as may be necessary to the establishment and operation of cooperative fish and wildlife restoration projects, as defined in said acts of congress, in compliance with said act and with rules and regulations promulgated by the Secretary of the Interior thereunder, and no funds accruing to the state from license, permit, tag and stamp fees, other than the stamp fee paid pursuant to section 26-27b, paid by hunters, trappers and anglers, including, but not limited to, license fees paid by hunters pursuant to sections 26-28, 26-30, 26-31, 26-36, 26-48a, 26-86a and 26-86c, and real or personal property acquired with license, permit, tag and stamp fees, interest, dividends, or other income earned on license, permit, tag and stamp fees shall be diverted for any other purpose than to fund the programs and functions of the Bureau of Natural Resources within the Department of Environmental Protection, in accordance with 50 CFR 80.4. (71)

Sec. 26-15a. Appropriations to Bureau of Natural Resources. Federal aid. Annual report. (72)(Text)

(a) The provisions of section 26-15 shall remain in full force and effect, and there shall be appropriated to the Bureau of Natural Resources within the Department of Environmental Protection for each fiscal year a sum not less than the total estimated receipts from fishing and hunting and trapping licenses, permits, tags and stamps, other than the Connecticut Migratory Bird Conservation Stamp described in section 26-27b, for such year issued under the provisions of this chapter and income earned from license fees, including interest and dividends, income earned from assets acquired with license, permit, tag and stamp fees and the sale or leasing of real or personal property. (73)

(b) To the extent authorized by federal law or regulation, the Department of Environmental Protection shall supplement the funds appropriated to the department for fish and wildlife programs by taking full advantage of the annual apportionment made pursuant to the provisions of (1) Public Law 681, 81st Congress, entitled "An Act to Provide that the United States Shall Aid the States in Fish Restoration and Management Projects, and for Other Purposes", approved August 9, 1950, and (2) the act of Congress entitled "An Act to Provide that the United States Shall Aid the States in Wildlife Restoration Projects, and for Other Purposes", approved September 2, 1937. On or before February first, annually, the department shall submit a report to the joint standing committee of the General Assembly having cognizance of matters relating to appropriations and the budgets of state agencies, which sets forth, for the twelve-month period ending the preceding September thirtieth, the amount of such federal funds received by the department, the amount of such funds expended and the purposes for which such funds were expended. (74)

Sec. 26-15b. Annual report re license, permit, stamp and tag fees and expenditures for fish and wildlife programs. (75)(Text)

On or before October first of each year, the Department of Environmental Protection shall submit a report to the Chief of the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Department of the Interior, that sets forth for the twelve-month period ending the preceding June thirtieth, the amount of license, permit, stamp, other than the Connecticut Migratory Bird Conservation Stamp, and tag fees paid by hunters, trappers and anglers pursuant to the provisions of this chapter as well as interest, dividends and sale or lease payments from assets purchased with license, permit, stamp and tag revenues and the amount of funds expended on fish and wildlife programs and the purposes for which such funds were expended. Additionally, such report shall include, but not be limited to, the amount of expenditures for: (1) The protection, propagation, preservation and investigation of fish and game, (2) the operation, administration and maintenance of fish and wildlife facilities, (3) the operation and administration of wildlife management areas and fish and wildlife access areas, (4) the restoration and enhancement of fish and wildlife habitat, (5) the operation and administration of angler and hunter education and outreach programs, and (6) the administration of fish and wildlife technical assistance programs. (76)

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