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Texas Laws | Human Resource Code
HUMAN RESOURCES CODE
TITLE 3. FACILITIES AND SERVICES FOR CHILDREN

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 564, Sec. 1, eff. Aug. 28, 1989. (7088)

Amended by: (7089)

Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 87 (S.B. 1969), Sec. 13.026, eff. September 1, 2009. (7090)

Sec. 63.025. ADMISSION OF AND PAYMENT FOR SERVICES PROVIDED TO JUVENILES RESIDING IN ANOTHER COUNTY. (7091)(Text)

The board of trustees may provide that juveniles who reside outside the boundaries of a county that participated in the formation of the facility may be admitted to the facility. However, the charges to the county of residence of the juvenile may be billed at a rate higher than that charged to a county that participated in the formation of the facility. (7092)

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 564, Sec. 1, eff. Aug. 28, 1989. (7093)

Amended by: (7094)

Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 87 (S.B. 1969), Sec. 13.027, eff. September 1, 2009. (7095)

Sec. 63.026. COURT-ORDERED ADMISSION. (7096)(Text)

A juvenile may be admitted upon the order of a court of competent jurisdiction that finds that the juvenile has engaged in delinquent conduct and is in need of supervision or is experiencing a dysfunctional home environment and will benefit from placement in the facility. (7097)

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 564, Sec. 1, eff. Aug. 28, 1989. (7098)

Amended by: (7099)

Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 87 (S.B. 1969), Sec. 13.028, eff. September 1, 2009. (7100)

Sec. 63.027. LIMITATION ON PERIOD FOR JUVENILE'S RESIDENCE. (7101)(Text)

The court will include in its order the length of time that the juvenile will reside in the facility, which will not exceed a period of one year. At the conclusion of the one-year period, the court will make a determination as to whether the juvenile will benefit from further residence within the facility. The court may then order the juvenile to be placed into the facility for additional time not to exceed one year. (7102)

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 564, Sec. 1, eff. Aug. 28, 1989. (7103)

Amended by: (7104)

Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 87 (S.B. 1969), Sec. 13.029, eff. September 1, 2009. (7105)

Sec. 63.028. MODIFICATION OF COURT ORDER. (7106)(Text)

The court may modify any order by which a juvenile is placed in the facility upon recommendation of the director of the facility. (7107)

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 564, Sec. 1, eff. Aug. 28, 1989. (7108)

Amended by: (7109)

Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 87 (S.B. 1969), Sec. 13.030, eff. September 1, 2009. (7110)

SUBTITLE B. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN (7111)(Text)

CHAPTER 72. HEAD START PROGRAMS (7112)(Text)
Sec. 72.001. DEFINITION. (7113)(Text)

In this chapter, "Head Start program" means the federal program established under the Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. Section 9831 et seq.) and its subsequent amendments. (7114)

Added by Acts 1999, 76th Leg., ch. 402, Sec. 2, eff. Aug. 30, 1999. (7115)

Sec. 72.002. EDUCATIONAL SERVICES. (7116)(Text)

To promote the comprehensive health, safety, and well-being of children receiving child care through Head Start programs, a program provider shall provide educational services to children participating in the program so that each child is prepared to enter school and is ready to learn after completing the program. The educational services provided must include components designed to enable a child to: (7117)

(1) develop phonemic, print, and numeracy awareness, including the ability to: (7118)

(A) recognize that letters of the alphabet are a special category of visual graphics that can be individually named; (7119)

(B) recognize a word as a unit of print; (7120)

(C) identify at least 10 letters of the alphabet; and (7121)

(D) associate sounds with written words; (7122)

(2) understand and use language to communicate for various purposes; (7123)

(3) understand and use an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary; (7124)

(4) develop and demonstrate an appreciation of books; and (7125)

(5) progress toward mastery of the English language, if the child's primary language is a language other than English. (7126)

Added by Acts 1999, 76th Leg., ch. 402, Sec. 2, eff. Aug. 30, 1999. (7127)

Sec. 72.003. COORDINATION OF SERVICES. (7128)(Text)

(a) In a manner consistent with federal law and regulations, each Head Start and Early Head Start program provider shall coordinate with the Texas Workforce Commission and local workforce development boards regarding subsidized child-care services. (7129)

(b) The coordination required by this section must include coordinating to ensure, to the extent practicable, that full-day, full-year child-care services are available to meet the needs of low-income parents who are working or participating in workforce training or workforce education. The coordination may also include: (7130)

(1) cooperating with the Texas Workforce Commission regarding studies conducted by the commission; (7131)

(2) collecting data necessary to determine a child's eligibility for subsidized child-care services or a Head Start or Early Head Start program, when permissible; (7132)

(3) cooperating to provide for staff training and professional development activities; (7133)

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