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Texas Laws | Penal Code
PENAL CODE
TITLE 3. PUNISHMENTS

(d) It is a defense to a charge under Subsection (b)(4) that the conduct in question meets the elements of necessity outlined in Section 9.22. (748)

(e) For purposes of this section, "emergency evacuation order" means an official statement issued by the governing body of this state or a political subdivision of this state to recommend or require the evacuation of all or part of the population of an area stricken or threatened with a disaster. (749)

Added by Acts 2009, 81st Leg., R.S., Ch. 731 (S.B. 359), Sec. 1, eff. September 1, 2009. (750)

SUBCHAPTER E. CORPORATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS (751)(Text)
Sec. 12.51. AUTHORIZED PUNISHMENTS FOR CORPORATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS. (752)(Text)

(a) If a corporation or association is adjudged guilty of an offense that provides a penalty consisting of a fine only, a court may sentence the corporation or association to pay a fine in an amount fixed by the court, not to exceed the fine provided by the offense. (753)

(b) If a corporation or association is adjudged guilty of an offense that provides a penalty including imprisonment, or that provides no specific penalty, a court may sentence the corporation or association to pay a fine in an amount fixed by the court, not to exceed: (754)

(1) $20,000 if the offense is a felony of any category; (755)

(2) $10,000 if the offense is a Class A or Class B misdemeanor; (756)

(3) $2,000 if the offense is a Class C misdemeanor; or (757)

(4) $50,000 if, as a result of an offense classified as a felony or Class A misdemeanor, an individual suffers serious bodily injury or death. (758)

(c) In lieu of the fines authorized by Subsections (a), (b)(1), (b)(2), and (b)(4), if a court finds that the corporation or association gained money or property or caused personal injury or death, property damage, or other loss through the commission of a felony or Class A or Class B misdemeanor, the court may sentence the corporation or association to pay a fine in an amount fixed by the court, not to exceed double the amount gained or caused by the corporation or association to be lost or damaged, whichever is greater. (759)

(d) In addition to any sentence that may be imposed by this section, a corporation or association that has been adjudged guilty of an offense may be ordered by the court to give notice of the conviction to any person the court deems appropriate. (760)

(e) On conviction of a corporation or association, the court shall notify the attorney general of that fact. (761)

Acts 1973, 63rd Leg., p. 883, ch. 399, Sec. 1, eff. Jan. 1, 1974. Amended by Acts 1977, 65th Leg., p. 1917, ch. 768, Sec. 1, eff. June 16, 1977; Acts 1987, 70th Leg., ch. 1085, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1987; Acts 1993, 73rd Leg., ch. 900, Sec. 1.01, eff. Sept. 1, 1994. (762)

TITLE 4. INCHOATE OFFENSES (763)(Text)

CHAPTER 15. PREPARATORY OFFENSES (764)(Text)

Sec. 15.01. CRIMINAL ATTEMPT. (765)(Text)

(a) A person commits an offense if, with specific intent to commit an offense, he does an act amounting to more than mere preparation that tends but fails to effect the commission of the offense intended. (766)

(b) If a person attempts an offense that may be aggravated, his conduct constitutes an attempt to commit the aggravated offense if an element that aggravates the offense accompanies the attempt. (767)

(c) It is no defense to prosecution for criminal attempt that the offense attempted was actually committed. (768)

(d) An offense under this section is one category lower than the offense attempted, and if the offense attempted is a state jail felony, the offense is a Class A misdemeanor. (769)

Acts 1973, 63rd Leg., p. 883, ch. 399, Sec. 1, eff. Jan. 1, 1974. Amended by Acts 1975, 64th Leg., p. 478, ch. 203, Sec. 4, eff. Sept. 1, 1975; Acts 1993, 73rd Leg., ch. 900, Sec. 1.01, eff. Sept. 1, 1994. (770)

Sec. 15.02. CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY. (771)(Text)

(a) A person commits criminal conspiracy if, with intent that a felony be committed: (772)

(1) he agrees with one or more persons that they or one or more of them engage in conduct that would constitute the offense; and (773)

(2) he or one or more of them performs an overt act in pursuance of the agreement. (774)

(b) An agreement constituting a conspiracy may be inferred from acts of the parties. (775)

(c) It is no defense to prosecution for criminal conspiracy that: (776)

(1) one or more of the coconspirators is not criminally responsible for the object offense; (777)

(2) one or more of the coconspirators has been acquitted, so long as two or more coconspirators have not been acquitted; (778)

(3) one or more of the coconspirators has not been prosecuted or convicted, has been convicted of a different offense, or is immune from prosecution; (779)

(4) the actor belongs to a class of persons that by definition of the object offense is legally incapable of committing the object offense in an individual capacity; or (780)

(5) the object offense was actually committed. (781)

(d) An offense under this section is one category lower than the most serious felony that is the object of the conspiracy, and if the most serious felony that is the object of the conspiracy is a state jail felony, the offense is a Class A misdemeanor. (782)

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