Goto previous pageGoto next page
pg. 115

Texas Laws | Probate Code
CHAPTER VIII. PROCEEDINGS DURING ADMINISTRATION
PART 6. HIRING AND RENTING

(2902)

Acts 1955, 54th Leg., p. 88, ch. 55, eff. Jan. 1, 1956. (2903)

Text of article effective until January 01, 2014 (2904)

(1) The property involved and its appraised value. (2905)

(2) The date of hiring or renting, and whether at public auction or privately. (2906)

(3) The name of the person or persons hiring or renting such property. (2907)

(4) The amount of such hiring or rental. (2908)

(5) Whether the hiring or rental was for cash or on credit, and, if on credit, the length of time, the terms, and the security taken therefor. (2909)

(b) When the value of the property involved is less than Three Thousand Dollars, the hiring or renting thereof may be reported upon in the next annual or final account which shall be filed as required by law. (2910)

Acts 1955, 54th Leg., p. 88, ch. 55, eff. Jan. 1, 1956. (2911)

Text of article effective until January 01, 2014 (2912)

Sec. 366. ACTION OF COURT ON REPORT. At any time after five days from the time such report of hiring or renting is filed, it shall be examined by the court and approved and confirmed by order of the court if found just and reasonable; but, if disapproved, the estate shall not be bound and the court may order another offering of the property for hire or rent, in the same manner and subject to the same rules heretofore provided. (2913)(Text)

If the report has been approved and it later appears that, by reason of any fault of the representative of the estate, the property has not been hired or rented for its reasonable value, the court shall cause the representative of the estate and his sureties to appear and show cause why the reasonable value of hire or rent of such property shall not be adjudged against him. (2914)

Acts 1955, 54th Leg., p. 88, ch. 55, eff. Jan. 1, 1956. (2915)

PART 7. MINERAL LEASES, POOLING OR UNITIZATION AGREEMENTS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING TO MINERAL PROPERTIES (2916)(Text)

Text of article effective until January 01, 2014 (2917)

Sec. 367. MINERAL LEASES AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE. (a) Certain Words and Terms Defined. (2918)(Text)

As used throughout in this Part of this Chapter, the words "land" or "interest in land" include minerals or any interest in any of such minerals in place. The word "property" includes land, minerals in place, whether solid, liquid or gaseous, as well as an interest of any kind in such property, including royalty, owned by the estate. "Mineral development" includes exploration, by geophysical or by any other means, drilling, mining, developing, and operating, and producing and saving oil, other liquid hydrocarbons, gas (including all liquid hydrocarbons in the gaseous phase in the reservoir), gaseous elements, sulphur, metals, and all other minerals, solid or otherwise. (2919)

(b) Mineral Leases, With or Without Pooling or Unitization. Personal representatives of the estates of decedents, appointed and qualified under the laws of this State, and acting solely under orders of court, may be authorized by the court in which the probate proceedings on such estates are pending to make, execute, and deliver leases, with or without unitization clauses or pooling provisions, providing for the exploration for, and development and production of, oil, other liquid hydrocarbons, gas (including all liquid hydrocarbons in the gaseous phase), metals, and other solid minerals, and other minerals, or any of such minerals in place, belonging to such estates. (2920)

(c) Rules Concerning Applications, Orders, Notices, and Other Essential Matters. All such leases, with or without pooling provisions or unitization clauses, shall be made and entered into pursuant to and in conformity with the following rules: (2921)

1. Contents of Application. The representative of the estate shall file with the county clerk of the county where the probate proceeding is pending his written application, addressed to the court or the judge of such court, asking for authority to lease property of the estate for mineral exploration and development, with or without pooling provisions or unitization clauses. The application shall (a) describe the property fully enough by reference to the amount of acreage, the survey name or number, or abstract number, or other description adequately identifying the property and its location in the county in which situated; (b) specify the interest thought to be owned by the estate, if less than the whole, but asking for authority to include all interest owned by the estate, if that be the intention; and (c) set out the reasons why such particular property of the estate should be leased. Neither the name of any proposed lessee, nor the terms, provisions, or form of any desired lease, need be set out or suggested in any such application for authority to lease for mineral development. (2922)

2. Order Designating Time and Place for Hearing Application. (2923)

(a) Duties of Clerk and Judge. When an application to lease, as above prescribed, is filed, the county clerk shall immediately call the filing of such application to the attention of the court, and the judge shall promptly make and enter a brief order designating the time and place for the hearing of such application. (2924)

Goto previous page115Goto next page

  

Our Mission
Objective

Our mission is to provide citizens free access to the laws and codes of their state utilizing a unique search engine that matches clients with qualified legal professionals who can help with specific issues.

Our goal is to do this in a manner that promotes open government and freedom of information, while providing attorneys with valuable tools to connect with qualified prospects in need of professional services.

Ignorance Is No Excuse
Your Right To Know The Law

All citizens have a right to have access to the laws that govern them. Citizen awareness and participation in government is fundamental to ensuring a sound democracy.

Although unfettered access to the law is a fundamental right to all citizens, there is no substitute for experienced legal counsel.

We do not recommend self-representation. We do, however, recognize that in an age where people routinely research legal matters online using everything from a smartphone to their xbox, both attorneys and clients alike can benefit from this resource.