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Texas Laws | Probate Code
CHAPTER VI. SPECIAL TYPES OF ADMINISTRATION
PART 4. INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATION

The independent executor, in such event, may sell the real property under the authority granted in the court order without the further consent of those beneficiaries. (1538)

Added by Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 1.22, eff. September 1, 2011. (1539)

Amended by: (1540)

Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 2.54(b)(2), eff. January 1, 2014. (1541)

Without reference to the amendment of this section, this section was repealed by Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 2.54(b)(2), eff. January 1, 2014. (1542)

Sec. 145B. INDEPENDENT EXECUTORS MAY ACT WITHOUT COURT APPROVAL. Unless this code specifically provides otherwise, any action that a personal representative subject to court supervision may take with or without a court order may be taken by an independent executor without a court order. (1543)(Text)

The other provisions of this part are designed to provide additional guidance regarding independent administrations in specified situations, and are not designed to limit by omission or otherwise the application of the general principles set forth in this part. (1544)

Added by Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 1.22, eff. September 1, 2011. (1545)

Amended by: (1546)

Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 2.54(b)(2), eff. January 1, 2014. (1547)

Without reference to the amendment of this section, this section was repealed by Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 2.54(b)(2), eff. January 1, 2014. (1548)

Sec. 145C. POWER OF SALE OF ESTATE PROPERTY. (a) Definition. (1549)(Text)

In this section, "independent executor" does not include an independent administrator. (1550)

(b) General. Unless limited by the terms of a will, an independent executor, in addition to any power of sale of estate property given in the will, and an independent administrator have the same power of sale for the same purposes as a personal representative has in a supervised administration, but without the requirement of court approval. The procedural requirements applicable to a supervised administration do not apply. (1551)

(c) Protection of Person Purchasing Estate Property. (1) A person who is not a devisee or heir is not required to inquire into the power of sale of estate property of the independent executor or independent administrator or the propriety of the exercise of the power of sale if the person deals with the independent executor or independent administrator in good faith and: (1552)

(A) a power of sale is granted to the independent executor in the will; (1553)

(B) a power of sale is granted under Section 145A of this code in the court order appointing the independent executor or independent administrator; or (1554)

(C) the independent executor or independent administrator provides an affidavit, executed and sworn to under oath and recorded in the deed records of the county where the property is located, that the sale is necessary or advisable for any of the purposes described in Section 341(1) of this code. (1555)

(2) As to acts undertaken in good faith reliance, the affidavit described by Subsection (c)(1)(C) of this section is conclusive proof, as between a purchaser of property from an estate, and the personal representative of the estate or the heirs and distributees of the estate, with respect to the authority of the independent executor or independent administrator to sell the property. The signature or joinder of a devisee or heir who has an interest in the property being sold as described in this section is not necessary for the purchaser to obtain all right, title, and interest of the estate in the property being sold. (1556)

(3) This section does not relieve the independent executor or independent administrator from any duty owed to a devisee or heir in relation, directly or indirectly, to the sale. (1557)

(d) No Limitations. This section does not limit the authority of an independent executor or independent administrator to take any other action without court supervision or approval with respect to estate assets that may take place in a supervised administration, for purposes and within the scope otherwise authorized by this code, including the authority to enter into a lease and to borrow money. (1558)

Added by Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 1.22, eff. September 1, 2011. (1559)

Amended by: (1560)

Acts 2011, 82nd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1338, Sec. 2.54(b)(2), eff. January 1, 2014. (1561)

Text of article effective until January 01, 2014 (1562)

Sec. 146. PAYMENT OF CLAIMS AND DELIVERY OF EXEMPTIONS AND ALLOWANCES. (a) Duty of the Independent Executor. (1563)(Text)

An independent executor, in the administration of an estate, independently of and without application to, or any action in or by the court: (1564)

(1) shall give the notices required under Sections 294 and 295; (1565)

(2) may give the notice permitted under Section 294(d) and bar a claim under that subsection; (1566)

(3) shall approve, classify, and pay, or reject, claims against the estate in the same order of priority, classification, and proration prescribed in this Code; and (1567)

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